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February, 1910

• Twenty five trucks of bluestone spalls are despatched to Rochester. A second consignment of seventy trucks has been ordered. [This loading would be from Reilly's Quarry from Axedale Station].

March, 1910

• The special train from Bendigo for the Knowsley races met with a serious mishap to the driving gear of the engine before reaching Axedale. The connecting rod of the engine, which was running tender first, had broken, bringing the train to a standstill short of Axedale. The broken rod was removed and the train was able to continue inefficiently to Axedale. The first-class carriages were shunted to another line and the passengers transferred to the second-class carriages. Unfortunately, the lightened load still did not permit the engine to haul it up the long incline beyond Ingham. Passengers alighted during repeated attempts to scale the gradient. In a last-ditch attempt, half the carriages were detached and the train was run on to Knowsley.

After arriving at Knowsley, the engine was detached and returned to pick up the remaining carriages and passengers, the last contingent of which arrived at 4pm. As the train was timed to arrive at Knowsley at 2.15pm, the racing Club was put to some inconvenience. A relief engine was despatched to Knowsley from Bendigo, accomplishing the return journey with the complete train and no further mishap.

• Martin Burns, Jnr., is appointed Trustee of the land temporarily reserved on 18 June 1871, as a site for Racecourse and Recreation purposes at Axedale, following the death of his father.

June, 1910

• A combined junior football team, composed of St. John's and St. Andrew's School teams, visit Axedale to try against a team of juniors from the Axedale district. A Heathcote team also journeyed to Axedale with special arrangements being made to stop at the reserve siding [Axedale Racecourse Platform] in both directions to save walking distance.

November, 1910

• Stone from the Axedale quarries has been railed to Kerang, a distance of some 92 miles [147km]. It is expected that with a delivery of 12 trucks per day, it will take three months to fulfil the order.

• Owing to the shortage of trucks, 50,000 bluestone cubes are lying at Axedale. Bendigo Creek paving has been stopped and the paving contractors had to discharge 20 men. The Railway Commissioners assure that four trucks will be sent to Bendigo exclusively to convey cubes from Axedale to Bendigo.


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February, 1911

• Mr. V.A. Deane [Napthali Ingham's son-in-law], calls attention to the bad condition of the main road at Ingham's Hill.

April, 1911

• Grain traffic is quiet, due in part, to a shortage of trucks and the state of the wheat market. Wheat is stacked at various sidings and stations.

May, 1911

• Mr. Deane advises the McIvor Shire that he could not put 2 inch [50mm] metal on the road at Ingham's Hill as he had no crusher, but he would put a coating of metal chips and gravel; also that a channel was required down the left hand side of the road.


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January, 1912

• A special train to Melbourne from Axedale, in connection with another special from Wycheproof, then all stations to Kilmore Junction. Fares are included.

February, 1912

• Ronald McDonald was charged with unlawfully assaulting Constable Fattorini at Longlea station on Saturday, 3rd February. He was also charged with using obscene language in a railway carriage on the same day. Mr. O'Halloran appeared for defendant.

Constable Fattorini deposed that he was going to Axedale on 3rd February. When the train arrived at Longlea witness got out of the carriage and watched defendant, who was using obscene language. Witness was in plain clothes, and he told defendant he was a Constable. He asked defendant to moderate his language as there were ladies about. Defendant made use of a certain expression, and struck witness in the face. Defendant had a bottle in his hand. Witness then pulled his handcuffs out, and defendant apologised. When they arrived at Axedale they went into the Stationmaster's office, and witness took defendant's name. Witness's mouth, was cut and swollen to such an extent that he was unable to eat. His teeth were also broken.

Senior Constable Semmens deposed to arresting defendant at Heathcote. He said he was not aware that Fattorini was a Constable or he would not have acted in the way he did. The defendant had an excellent reputation in Heathcote. The defendant went into the box and swore that he never used any bad language on the day in question. When the constable came to the carriage door he thought he was an interfering civilian. He came to the carriage, and after accusing witness of using bad language, threatened to 'fix him up.' Witness told him to get out, and struck him. He afterwards apologised when he discovered that he was a Constable.

Dr. Rockett deposed that Fattorini had a small bruise on the lip, a small cut underneath the lip, and also had a small bruise underneath the tongue.

Michael Barrett and Arthur Warne, fellow passengers, denied that any bad language was used in the carriage during the journey. William Quinn, another passenger, swore that bad language was used, but not by defendant.

A fine of 20/- wan imposed for using obscene language and £3 for the assault, with £7/17/0 costs, in default three months' imprisonment.

April, 1912

• The gates at the crossing near the Stationmaster's residence at Axedale, are being removed and replaced with cattle pits. The Stationmaster's residence is to be removed and re-erected on a more convenient site closer to the station. [There is no separate mention of the removal of a Gatekeeper's cottage that would no longer be required. Also, a shooting article at that location in November, 1891, stated that the person to whom the victim was speaking, was Mrs. Smythe, wife of the Gatekeeper. The Stationmaster's residence was opposite the passenger platform in later years].

July, 1912

• Together with 120 acres [48.6ha] of first class agricultural land, adjoining the township [Axedale], within a half mile of the railway station, the only bluestone quarries now working in Axedale is advertised for sale. The quarries are bringing in a good weekly rental. The Allotments concerned are 11, 12 and 13, of Section 6, in the name of O'Neill, and adjoining the township on its northern side. The owner of the property, Mr. O'Neill, has purchased a larger property in the north. The property includes a 5 room dwelling and outbuildings. [Brasier, Nelson and Riley may have been leasing the quarry at the time the property was advertised, and may even have bought it].

November, 1912

• An interesting event took place at Ingham's Siding on Tuesday afternoon, the occasion being a demonstration and starting of a new 13 b.h.p. portable Tangye oil engine, which has just been purchased by Mr. V. A. Deane, together with a large circular saw, for cutting firewood box blocks.

Numerous residents of Axedale and surrounding districts attended, including Cr. M. Burns and the Rev. Mr. Thompson of Goornong. The engine was put to a severe test and proved capable of doing the heavy work it was subjected to. After refreshments had been partaken of, Cr. Burns moved a vote of thanks to Mr. Deane and Messrs. Dalgety and Co., and wished Mr. Deane every success in his new venture. The Rev. Mr. Thompson seconded the motion, and said it gave him great pleasure to be present, and congratulated Mr. Deane upon his choice of oil engine, as he (Mr. Thompson) was there as an expert, having for a great many years been a skilled engineer. He had examined the engine, and found it all that could be desired in every respect, and would personally recommend it to anyone requiring a first-class engine.

December, 1912

• Boxing Day was Bendigo's visiting day with crowded special trains and visits to Kyneton, Castlemaine, Marong, Axedale, Elmore, Bridgewater and Campbell's Creek. Motor cars were also used. At least 20,000 people must have passed through Bendigo Station.

• A note indicating that its writer will have thrown themselves off the train at the Campaspe River bridge, Axedale, is found.


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January, 1913

• The house of Mr. James Hennesey is burned down.

February, 1913

• Mr. V.A. Deane complains to the McIvor Shire Council, of a 'menace' and 'nuisance' on the shire road approaching Ingham. The Shire Engineer is to inspect it. [The road is now known as Quarry Road].

March, 1913

• Mr. Deane again complains of obstruction and damage done to road at Axedale by sawmill plant. Samuel Doak, Axedale, said that W. Curthoys had complained to him of an obstruction on the road leading to Ingham's siding. As a landowner adjoining, he had no objection to the firewood mill remaining on tho road in its present position. James Heffernan, Axedale, said the same thing.

The McIvor Council Engineer reports: I have the honor to report that I inspected the road leading from the Heathcote-Bendigo Road, leading to Ingham's railway aiding, concerning which a complaint was made by V. A. Deane at last meeting.

The sawmill referred to by Mr Deane is, as stated, on the road and consists of a portable engine and saw bench used for cutting firewood. The roadway has apparently been used as mill sites for a number of years by various persons, the object being to get as close to the siding as possible to save cartage. The public accommodation at tho siding is very limited outside, by the area occupied by a sawmill I believe owned by Mr. Deane. On the roadway the mill referred to above, is owned by Mr Curthoys, the sawdust from this is carted onto an area of Crown Lands, and forming the eastern boundary of the road. The heaps of sawdust referred to by Mr. Deane are from a mill which has been removed for some time. These heaps do not form any serious obstruction to the road.

Having regard to the whole of the surroundings, I cannot take the strong views held by Mr Deane in regard to the damage to the road or the seriousness of the obstruction caused by the use of the roadway by the sawmiller and carters. Having regard, however, to the fact that the road is being illegally occupied. I would recommend the Council to give Mr Curthoys, a reasonable time to remove his mill. [The Stationmaster at Axedale in 1926, may have been Mr. Curthoys' son]..

May, 1913

• Mr. V.A. Deane again draws Council's attention to the condition of the Government road, leading to Ingham's Siding, such road being blocked by a firewood sawmilling plant. The Council notice requesting removal has apparently been ignored. He intends bringing the matter under t the notice of the Minister of Lands.

July, 1913

• The Railways Commissioners have decided to extend the system of connecting stations, in the charge of Caretakers, with their supervising stations and authority has been issued for connecting Longlea to the Supervising station, Axedale.

August, 1913

• Mrs. Curthoys, wife of Mr. W. Curthoys, woodcutter, passes away after an illness of only a day, at her Ingham residence, leaving a widower, four boys and three girls. [Mr. C. Curthoys was Stationmaster at Axedale in 1926].

November, 1913

• Thomas Craike, who sold his father's farm at Axe Creek and moved to Western Australia in ..., is killed in an accident at his property called "Strathfieldsaye", in Trayning, Western Australia. He is thrown forward from a cart loaded with hay and is killed when it runs over him.


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February, 1914 - The Year World War 1 started.

• Farmers are complaining of loss of grain from bags left standing in stubble paddocks waiting carting to the railway station. Many bags have lost most of their contents through the depredations of birds.

March, 1913

• Axedale land transaction, claim for commission, a question of agreement:

"An interesting case was heard in the City Court on 23rd ult., before Messrs. D. Berriman, P.M., and J. W. Faul, J.P. when Philip Anton Adrian Mueller sued Victor Allen Deane, a farmer, residing at Axedale, for work and labour done between 13th and 19th April, 1913, in introducing defendant to Messrs. Spencer, Vains and Co., auctioneers, etc., and opening up negotiations for the purchase by defendant of certain land at Axedale, for which work defendant promised to pay plaintiff £50 if defendant purchased the land, which land defendant did purchase on 30th April, 1913. Messrs. L. J. Murphy and F. Cohen appeared for the plaintiff, and Sir. John Quick for defendant.

Mr. Murphy said the facts, when summarised, amounted to this: Deane asked Mueller to introduce him to the auctioneers for the purchase of the farm, and promised him a commission of £50 if the sale was completed. The sale was completed, and Mueller was now claiming £50 as commission. It might be said that the amount of work done was very small, having regard to the sum claimed, but if the Bench found that there was a consideration between the parties, it did not matter what the amount was.

The formal defences were: (1) That there was no work and labour done for defendant; (2) that no request was made to do any work or labour for defendant; (3) that the plaintiff was a volunteer and offered to go see Mr. Spencer and obtain information; (4) that no promise was made to pay; (5) that defendant derived no benefit or advantage from plaintiff's intervention or anything that he did; (6) that plaintiff was not instrumental in bringing the sale; (7) that plaintiff rather prejudiced the defendant as a prospect by prematurely disclosing his name.

Mr. Murphy submitted that a host of the objections were irrelevant to the issue.

Mr. Berriman: You cannot deal with Sir. John's defences. Let us hear the evidence.

On the application of Mr. Murphy, the evidence was reduced to writing.

The plaintiff deposed that he was the owner of a farm at Axedale, which, about April, he sold to John McNutt. He met defendant in Pall Mall about 19th of April, when he said, "I believe you have sold your farm at Axedale. You were a fool not to sell it me. I am still a buyer." Witness advised him to go round to Spencer, Vains and Co., the agents. He replied that was no good to him, and refused to go. He asked witness to go round and see them for him. Witness said, "No, you have humbugged me enough in regard to buying the property in the first place." Defendant then said, "As an inducement, I will give you £50 if I can get the farm for £7/15/0 an acre or about that." Witness asked him to put the promise in writing and Deane requested witness to go round and see Spencer, Vains and Co. Witness asked him to accompany him to the office, but he told witness to go first and he would meet him afterwards.

Witness saw Mr. Spencer shortly afterwards. Later on, defendant asked witness if he could get the farm at about £8/5/0 and witness said, he might be able to get it for £8. Witness told defendant that he could very likely get commission from the auctioneers, and defendant said, "Yes, I will see that you get it." Witness asked to put his promise to pay him in writing, but he said "there was no need for it; on his word as a gentleman, he would pay him the £50 if he got the farm for him at £7/15/0 or about that." Defendant afterwards accompanied witness to the auctioneers, where a conversation took place over the sale of the farm. When they came out, Deane repeated his promise to pay the £50. Defendant bought the land at £7/12/6 per acre, and later on, by his direction, the property was transferred to his wife. Witness went out to see him at his farm some time after, and asked him when he intended paying him the £50. He said, "I will pay it, but I can't, pay it now." He then referred to £3,000 odd which was the was the purchase price, and said it was a lot of money for him to find, and he could not give him the £50 at that stage. Witness suggested to him that he should give him the money after harvest and he said that would "suit him right down to the ground." Witness saw him on several other occasions, one of which was just prior to the sale of witness's implements on the farm, when he asked witness to let him have the oil engine for £75. Witness replied that it had cost him a great deal more than that. Deane said, "You are getting £50 from me and £75 for the oil engine. Witness replied that the sale of implements was in the hands of the auctioneers, and he would see them about it. Soon afterwards, he again went out to the farm, in company with Mr. Lawrence Murphy. They told him that they had come to see about payment of the £50. Deane then denied all knowledge of owing witness £50. He also said that witness had done nothing to earn the £50, and that "a fiver was all it was worth." Mr. Murphy said Deane had promised witness £50 and asked Deane if he intended paying it. He replied that 'a fiver' was sufficient. Mr. Murphy then said they would sue him for the £50.

To Sir John Quick: Witness was a grazier, not a commission or agent. He had not had any experience in the sale or purchase of property for other people. He had applied for a commission from the auctioneers, and had been promised £100 commission on the sale of this property. He had not received it yet. The £100 which he would receive from the auctioneers would include what he obtained from Deane.

Herbert Spencer deposed that on 19th April, last he was a member of the firm of Spencer, McKean and Vains, stock and station agents, Mitchell Street, Bendigo. The plaintiff and defendant were at the office of firm on 19th April. Mr. Mueller came to the office about 11 a.m. and asked if he would take a price for the Axedale property. Witness replied in the affirmative and Mueller asked what price he wanted. About 5 o'clock Mueller brought Deane to the office, and introduced him as a buyer of the land. The contract was drawn up, but Mr. Deane said he would come in on another date and sign it. When Mueller left the office, Deane came back, and told witness that he had to give Mueller £50 for his trouble. The introduction given by Mueller was the basis of the sale.

To Sir John Quick: Witness showed the first contract which he had drawn up to Deane. He told Mueller to try and get £8 for the land when it was sold in the first place. McNutt bought the land at £7/15/0, but Deane bought it at £7/12/6 as he would not give £7/15/0 for it. The firm offered it to Mueller at £7/7/6, but Mueller tried to sell it to Deane for £7/15/0. The firm had a letter from Mr. Murphy, demanding £109/10/0 commission for Mr. Mueller on the sale of this land. Mueller got the increase on the price of the land. He got 5/- per acre purchase money, the difference between the price he was offered the land at, and the price it was sold at.

Mr. Berriman: He said he was a grazier.

To Mr. Murphy: Witness told Mueller he could, have all over £7/7/6 he could get for the land.

At this stage, Mr. Murphy said he had not intended calling any more evidence, but seeing how the case had gone, he intended to give evidence himself.

Sir John Quick objected, as all the witnesses had been ordered out of court.

Mr. Berriman: We cannot refuse to hear the evidence. We can punish him for contempt of court.

Sir John Quick: It is very unfair.

Lawrence Murphy, solicitor, practising in Bendigo, deposed that he had heard the evidence of Mueller as to the statements of Deane at Axedale on 27th November, and evidence was correct. Before leaving, Deane said he was getting a stiff commission out of Spencer, McKean and Vains. Witness said, "You knew that at the time?." Deane replied, "Yes, I specially stipulated for it."

To Sir John Quick: Witness had heard the order for all witnesses to leave the court. He did not intend to give evidence until he saw how the case had gone.

This was all the evidence.

The defendant deposed that he met Mueller in Pall Mall on 19th April. Prior to this they had been good friends and neighbors. After a conversation Mueller volunteered to go round to Spencer, McKean and Vains to see if McNutt would sell the farm. Witness agreed, and told him to find out the lowest price they would take for it, but he must not disclose his name. If he did this he might make £50 commission. In the afternoon he again saw Mueller, who told him he had been round to see the auctioneers. He said they wanted £8 per acre for the land. Witness replied that was no good to him, as it was too much. He accompanied Mueller to the auctioneers' office. He was very familiar with the auctioneers. They saw Mr. Spencer, and witness asked what he wanted for the property at Axedale. No one introduced him to Mr. Spencer. Mr. Spencer said that he wanted £8 per acre, and witness refused it. Mr. Spencer asked witness to make him an offer, and he promised to see about it later on. He bought the land for £7/12/6 on behalf of his wife. Witness denied offering the plaintiff £50 commission.

To Mr. Murphy: The reason he did not go to the auctioneers himself in the first place, was because he wished to do Mr. Mueller a good turn by allowing him to get commission. He did not know anything detrimental to Spencer, McKean and Vains's reputation.

Mr. Berriman: The case has lasted a considerable time. It is right and proper that a case of considerable magnitude, such as this, where the facts are somewhat varied, should last for a time. We believe the story of the plaintiff. We decidedly do not believe the story of the defendant. I don't want to say too much, but in my opinion some portions of his evidence were very unsatisfactory. There will be an order for the amount claimed, with £35/5/0 costs.

At the request of Sir John Quick, a stay of execution for one week was granted." [The property may have been Deane's 'Waverley Estate']

• Line Repairer J. McInerney, who has been stationed at Axedale for some years, has received notice of transfer to Kangaroo Flat.

June, 1914

The permanent reservation of the Axedale Racecourse and Recreation Reserve appears in the Government Gazette: "In addition to, and adjoining the site permanently reserved therefore by Order of 10th March, 1873 - 17 acres 1 rood 1 perch, County of Bendigo, town of Axedale: Commencing at a point S. 31 deg. 51 min. E. 1 chain eighty six links from the south angle of Allotment 3c."

October, 1914

• Repairs to the Campaspe River Bridge are considered.


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November, 1915

• All Saints' Sunday School and St. John's Presbyterian Sunday School.

• Land of 8a, 3r, 5 and a half perches adjoining the Axedale Cemetery. A slaughteryard and boiling down works is erected on the property.


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February, 1916

• A block has again arisen at Axedale owing to want of sufficient storage room, platform accommodation and scarcity of trucks. A good sign of the times is the quantity of grain coming forward. Threshing is in full swing, and many large straw stacks are to be seen in paddocks in close proximity to one another, farmers recognising the value of straw this year, particularly oaten straw. Oats have threshed up to 14 bags of good sample.

April, 1916

• Two roads are proclaimed by Governor A.L. Stanley: One road starting at the North east angle of Allotment 7, Section 13 and another from the North West angle of Allotment 11B, Section 13. The actual notice date is march 28, 1916.

May, 1916

• The City Engineer reports on road works required close to the siding entrance. In wet weather, the gully becomes soft and water lies in places rendering the passage of sheep difficult. Cost should be about £20.

July, 1916

• A Rochester report in the Bendigo Advertiser: "The arrival of a supply of road metal from Axedale has made much-needed road repairs in the main streets possible."


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May, 1917

• Mr. F.A. Forbes, who has been Stationmaster at Axedale for two years and three months, has left. He is being promoted, and the people of Axedale and surrounding district, intend at an early date to, in a small way, present to him a token of the esteem in which he was held by those who at any time have had any business at the Axedale Railway Station. He is to be replaced by Mr. Collins from Fish Creek.

August, 1917

• Samuel Doak draws attention to the unfinished state of the culvert near Ingham and requests a drain be made at the junction of McIvor Road.

November, 1917

• Victor Deane complains of the condition of the road leading to the Campaspe bridge, near Mr. J. Heffernan's gate, also the road intersection of Quarry Road and McIvor Road.


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June, 1918

• Mr. W.R. Philpot, late Stationmaster of Golden Square passes away. He was in charge of Axedale Station for some years and was highly esteemed.

• Mr. V.A. Deane gives a public demonstration at his Waverley Estate, of a patent self-feeding chaff cutter and hay press, which has a capacity of cutting nine tons of chaff per hour. A good number of farmers and others interested in pastural pursuits attended to witness the trial. The machine was manufactured by the well-known firm of John Buncle and Sons, of Melbourne, and is one of the largest of the kind in the district. The plant was seen in operation cutting chaff, and it showed high efficiency. The chaff was uniformly cut, and the regularity in feeding was also a feature of the exhibition. There are several appliances for lucerne chaff cutting, which allows of the grading of the material. By the application of several mechanical contrivances, the lucerne can be turned out by the machine in the form of pollard, which is becoming a popular fodder for pigs, poultry, etc. The hay press, which is part of the plant, is of much utility on the farm. It is specially adapted for baling lucerne hay, and, as Mr. Deane is devoting much attention to culture of lucerne, that portion of the plant will be much availed of for pressing the lucerne. At the conclusion of the demonstration, Mr. Deane was congratulated for introducing to the district, such an up to date plant. [The property, Waverley Estate, is probably the subject of the court case with in which Deane was sued by Philip Anton Adrian Mueller in March 1914, for not paying commission.]

• Mr. G.T. Wilson, head teacher of the local school, is transferred to Kennington after about 12 months in the district.

October, 1918

• Talbot Quarries, Cohuna, say that Axedale bluestone could be put on rail for 6/- a cubic yard [0.9 cubic metres] and that the freight to Cohuna is 4/-.

November, 1918 - World War 1 ends.

• Special trains, engaged by the Hibernian Picnic Committee, are reported to have conveyed over 2,000 people to Axedale, while a more ordinary number journeyed by road..

December, 1918

• A picture of the Axedale Bridge over the Campaspe River - looking East?.


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